Riot's Valorant subreddit mods delete threads on anti cheat controversy

Aries

Administrator
Riot's 'Trusted' /Valorant mods deleted a thread about the game's Anti-Cheat causing issues in other games.
r/VALORANT - Riot's Anti-Cheat software Vanguard is causing frame drops in all my games, including Valorant making them unplayable with the software installed.
This important thread showing how Valorant's 'safe' kernel level always-on Anti-cheat is causing performance issues in other games was deleted by the mods of the Valorant subreddit.
Clearly not just a regular old bug, multiple people in the comments reporting the same and this is after the other big thread about concerns over their anti-cheat in which a Riot dev claimed that they made sure it won't interfere in any other programs, yet the thread was deleted anyway.
For those who don't know, this subreddit was created by Riot and they publicly boasted about how they handed over the subreddit to 'Trusted' people.

" Any anti-cheat that's a kernel driver, that runs on ring-0 is a big no from me.
EAC pulls it off with a service, VAC pulls it off with software integration. PunkBuster relied on a service (in earlier versions*1) There is no need for a kernel driver. This makes me think of things like SafeDisc.
Anything that can be compared to SafeDisc is bad.

EDIT: To clarify for people who don't understand what this means:
Ring-0 is essentially the lowest level something can run in.
Running in this permission level essentially means that a given driver has full administrative access to your operating system before it even throws a login screen. It can monitor the boot process, check every driver and device that loads at boot (at least after it's loaded), and can run arbitrary code without any input or knowledge from the user.
It doesn't matter whether you're logged in or not, or whether you've even played the game recently. It is ALWAYS running.

*1: u/Tuxbot123 pointed out that it used a kernel mode driver at some point, I looked it up, and later versions DID use one, it seems it became a required component around 2006, when Vista released, due to the increased security that Vista added. "


 

Nova

Member
I am not sure which side I am on this controversy. But I think right now not is the time for creating any controversy for any company. As people are already in search of something they can play as a community. But that being said, I guess valorant devs should address this.
 
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