Norway’s $47BN Coastal Highway

GameWise

Member
Apr 12, 2019
86
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The Norwegian government wants to create the largest infrastructure project in the country's history.


Norway's western coast has some pretty good looking landscapes. It certainly has been carved by glaciers throughout the ages. The current travel route is relatively quite slow. The Norwegian government is working on improving access to services, residential markets and labour markets across the country’s western regions by starting the largest infrastructure project in the nation’s history. This project would speed up the travel time.

The E39 runs between, Kristiansand in the far south of the country and Trondheim in the north. The route navigates its way across the fjord network and features no fewer than 7 ferry crossings. Norway is actually proposing to remove all ferry crossings on the E39 highway in order to better connect the region.

The new coastal highway project aims to completely eliminate the need for ferry services. It's possible to build a series of bridges and tunnels across, through and under the landscape.

The whole route won't be completely finished until 2025. The government has also unveiled plans to build the world's first sea tunnel for ships to bypass the storm-battered Stan peninsula in Norway. The fascinating project, estimated to cost $314 million will begin in 2019 and take about three to four years to complete.

Underwater tunnels are an interesting idea. Right now there is a Norwegian 7.7 km Eiksund Tunnel. It is known for being the deepest undersea tunnel in the world, reaching the depth of −287 m below sea level.

Right now, there are over 900 various road tunnels in Norway with total length exceeding 750 km.

Here are Norway's longest road tunnels: (Length: m):

Lærdalstunnelen - 24,509 m
Gudvangatunnel - 11,428 m
Folgefonntunnel - 11,150 m
Toven Tunnel - 10,665 m
Jondalstunnelen - 10,400 m
Mælefjelltunnelen - 9,354 m
Korgfjelltunnelen - 8,530 m
Steigentunnelen - 8,079 m
Bømlafjordtunnel - 7,888 m
Eiksundtunnelen - 7,765 m
Svartisentunnelen - 7,615 m
Høyangertunnelen - 7,543 m
Vallaviktunnelen - 7,510 m
Åkrafjordtunnelen - 7,400 m

Here are Norway's longest subsea road tunnels: (Length: m):

Karmøy Tunnel - 8,900 m
Bømlafjordtunnel - 7,888 m
Eiksundtunnelen - 7,765 m
Oslofjordtunnel - 7,230 m
Nordkapptunnelen - 6,871 m
Byfjordtunnelen - 5,875 m
Hitratunnelen - 5,645 m

Here are Norway's longest railway tunnels: (Length: m):

Romeriksporten - 14,580 m
Lieråsen tunnel - 10,723 m
Finsetunnelen - 10,600 m
Kvinesheitunnele - 9,065 m
Hægebostadtunnelen - 8,474 m
Trollkona tunnel - 8,043 m
Ulrikentunnelen - 7,670 m
Majorstuen-Hasle
Oslo Metro line 5 - 7,060 m

The economy of Norway is certainly a developed mixed economy with some state-ownership in strategic areas. Although sensitive to important global business cycles, the economy of Norway has shown strong growth since the start of the industrial era.

Currency of Norway is the Norwegian krone.

Norway Gross Domestic Product: 398.8 billion USD (2017) World Bank
Norway GDP per Capita: 75,504.57 USD (2017) World Bank
Norway Unemployment rate: 3.9% (Sep. 2019) Eurostat
Norway GNI per capita: 63,530 PPP dollars (2017) World Bank
Norway Gross national income: 335.6 billion PPP dollars (2017) World Bank
Norway GDP growth rate: 1.9% annual change (2017) World Bank



Above: Some of these Norwegian coins have holes in them. This might be because you can put a string through them and hang them on a string conveniently.



Above: Interesting Norwegian paper bills have pictures of fish, sailboat and lighthouse.



Above: Beautiful Norwegian Landscape



Above: Flag of Norway



Above: Beautiful buildings in Norway









 

GameWise

Member
Apr 12, 2019
86
10
10
It is very huge. Norway has high GDP per capita. Norway has lots of funds.

The GDP per capita of Norway in 2019 was $75,452, $6,033 less than in 2018, when it was $81,485.

In the world, there have been various cases of ship collisions with bridges. Hopefully, no ship will accidentally hit this highway.
 
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