Building your own Gaming PC

Jayson

Member
Have never tried it! Don't really have much a desire to. However, though, I do find it interesting - and I can see why certain people might want to.

Anyhow, who has tried this? How did you do it? How would you rate your creation? Also, how would you compare your gaming PC or others to store bought stuff?
 

marteebe

Member
I've recently done it, I needed an upgrade on my old 5 year-old PC and I wanted something that was capable of playing GTA V/PUBG etc. without dropping frames down to about 2fps because why not. I was actually quite scared starting out and worried about spending the money and wasting it when I dropped the core into its socket and stuff like that. But I watched a lot of videos online, prepared myself for it and worked out how I wanted to do it and in all honesty, the most annoying part was the fact it took 3 hours to do. An hour of that was moving the dang wires about.

In short, it's actually quite easy, you get to control what's in there and that's more worth it for me. At least I know how to update it now at least when a part goes out of date!
 
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Nerdface

Member
I've never tried it as I previously didn't feel confident enough with my hardware skills to do it..

Now that I'm working as an IT Technician and have done various hardware repairs, I reckon I could give it a decent go. Unfortunately I just don't have the spare funds right now. Perhaps in a year or two.. :geek:
 

marteebe

Member
I've never tried it as I previously didn't feel confident enough with my hardware skills to do it..

Now that I'm working as an IT Technician and have done various hardware repairs, I reckon I could give it a decent go. Unfortunately I just don't have the spare funds right now. Perhaps in a year or two.. :geek:
Haha, funds was the biggest barrier for me! In all honesty, I wouldn't worry about your skills with hardware. I was worried constantly about that but the reality is, it is all plug and play. The hardest part of my assembly was getting one or two screws to go in and sorting out the wires. It fairly painless, and especially so after you've dropped the core into place, that's the scariest part!
 
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Nova

Member
When building the custom PC and the laptop, you'd understand that you should be considering the specs like the graphics card and the RAM that can last few more years like say 16GB RAma and 4-6GB graphics card can be a good start.
 
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Gopnik

Member
16GB RAma and 4-6GB graphics card can be a good start.
Aww, you definitely don't choose the graphics card by its virtual memory size. If the chipset is weak (and being a weak one would mean probably being an old one too) the more VRAM on the older chipset wouldn't do anything to over-perform a new chipset with less VRAM. Mhm, not sure how clear the explanation is, lol.
 

LividJay

Member
I built my current PC back in 2012. It wasn't initially going to be a gaming PC, but rather powerful enough for software development. A little over a year ago I started updating it for PC gaming by adding more RAM, installing a proper video card, and installing an SSD.
 
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MeowsePad

Member
I'm still using my build from 2013. I've only done three upgrades to it: GPU, memory, and SSD.

The original specs in 2013:
Intel Core i7-3770k
AMD Radeon HD 7870 GHz Edition
8GB DDR3-1333
120 GB Mushkin Chronos SSD

Current specs:
Intel Core i7-3770k
NVidia GeForce GTX 1060 3GB
16GB DDR3-1333 (was 1600, but I let my dad borrow some of my 1600 memory and swapped it out for 1333 memory)
240GB ADATA SP550 SSD

I would love to upgrade to a Ryzen build, but I just don't have the money to do so right now.
 

Creaky

Member
Built a number of systems over the years, building your own you get to choose the parts you actually want to use and not what the manufacturer decides for you.