Are you able to repair consoles/PCs yourself?

Jayson

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Of course, your local gaming store would have the people to do it - but who can do it themselves? Do you find it difficult? How did you learn? What advice would you give someone looking to be a more DIY (do-it-yourself) gamer?

Anyway, a console is simply a computer - like a PC, sort of - so there are major similarities. What might the be?

Final Questions

Would it be more expensive to fix your own console and/or PC - assuming you knew how to fix them? I mean, how much would the parts be - on average? Would it be worth the time - even if you could afford the parts?
 
That's exactly the reason why I prefer building PCs. You know exactly what parts go into them when you build them, so if you find a part that's broken, you can try and repair it or simply buy a new one.

For consoles, most of the stuff isn't readily available, so I assume it would be more expensive to fix your own console/PC, and not worth the time.
 
Depends on what goes wrong, with youtube you can find any fix but sometimes the fix gets beyond my skill or what I trust myself to do. Simpler to go out and get new really.
 
I've fixed my XBOX before in terms of putting a new part in but when it comes to things like soldering and all that I'm outta luck with that one. It's a reason why I prefer PC's anyway, I've built mine myself and like xenonVirus said, you know what parts are in there and what condition they're in most likely. I've had to take mine to be built before (before I was a bit more confident in doing it) and it was a pain, it came back with wires glued in and that which made upgrading a pain.
 
I'd have to say that one of the hardest parts of building a PC is cable management. To anyone who hasn't built a PC, cable management is like pulling teeth - tough, painful, and tedious.
  • Tough because there are so many cables that have to be organized, and you also have to take care not to block the airflow.
  • Painful because you just want to start using the PC after you build it, but the cable management needs to be done.
  • Tedious because even with the cables, it takes forever and you keep thinking that there are other things to be doing.
 
I'd have to say that one of the hardest parts of building a PC is cable management. To anyone who hasn't built a PC, cable management is like pulling teeth - tough, painful, and tedious.
  • Tough because there are so many cables that have to be organized, and you also have to take care not to block the airflow.
  • Painful because you just want to start using the PC after you build it, but the cable management needs to be done.
  • Tedious because even with the cables, it takes forever and you keep thinking that there are other things to be doing.

Haha - I feel this one man. When I built mine, just organising the wires took longer than it did to actually put together the rest of it (or so it felt anyway!) so in the end I just kinda tucked them beneath this panel I've got in my case, so... c'est la vie in that regard! I don't look at the case anyway so it's always out of sight and out of mind on that one!
 
If you see it from economic perspective. I think fixing any electronic device is time consuming. Something people don't want to invest into.

And that means you have to find other expert people who can fix that.
 
I'd have to say that one of the hardest parts of building a PC is cable management. To anyone who hasn't built a PC, cable management is like pulling teeth - tough, painful, and tedious.
  • Tough because there are so many cables that have to be organized, and you also have to take care not to block the airflow.
  • Painful because you just want to start using the PC after you build it, but the cable management needs to be done.
  • Tedious because even with the cables, it takes forever and you keep thinking that there are other things to be doing.
I took out my PC's DVD burner and thus made more space for air flow. I use three high CFM fans as well. Keeps my SSDs around 30-35C even with the PC running 24/7.

Anyway, as for repair, yes. I've been building PCs since 2005. :D
 

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